Snarky Title Goes Here

This is a blog full of an odd mix of Golden Sun, Avengers, and pretty much everything else I love, find interesting, or inspiring. Oh, and Pokemon. Always Pokemon. So, pretty much everything. Enjoy!

I tag most things (though not always intelligibly). Just ask. :)

(Sometimes I turn into a crazy cashier at night.)
Who I Follow

(via lyraeon)

al-grave:

Too Many Hands

al-grave:

Too Many Hands

(via godotal)

yasogamiprince:

just a mess I made on mypaint (it has interesting brushes and a nice interface)

(via fuzzeh)

mediamattersforamerica:

NRA News shamelessly promotes viewer-submitted pictures of children with firearms, some engaged in unsafe gun practices

Meanwhile, these accidental shootings by children in the U.S. happened within just one month: August 2nd - September 2nd, 2014. 

A 7-year-old boy shot himself at his family’s homemade shooting range in California:  

The boy was reportedly firing a single-shot, .22 bolt action youth rifle under his father’s supervision. When the boy cried out, his father noticed there was a small hole in his shirt, then blood.

A 9-year-old girl accidentally shot and killed her instructor with an Uzi in Arizona: 

"(The mother) was visibly upset and shaken," the report reads. She said "the gun went off and saw (her daughter) drop the gun. (The girl) turned to her and told her the gun was too much for her and it hurt her shoulder. (The mother) said no one knew Vacca was shot until the other instructor ran over."

A 4-year-old boy in Texas was injured after he found his parents’ handgun: 

The boy climbed into his parents’ bedroom closet in their home on the 600 block of Destin Drive and found their .38-caliber gun on the top shelf, Fort Worth police said. The gun was loaded and unlocked when the boy pulled the trigger.

A 13-year-old boy was shot and killed by his 14-year-old friend while they were handling a rifle in Oklahoma:

Police say initially the other teens said the victim shot himself with the gun, but after questioning them separately, police say the 14-year-old accidentally fired the gun … Police say the rifle used was stolen from a home in Midwest City in 2011. Right now investigators don’t know how the gun ended up in the teens hands. 

A 9-year-old girl died after shooting herself with her father’s gun:

"The young lady was searching or looking around, found the weapon, was pulling it out of the drawer an the gun discharged as he was pulling it out of the drawer," said Police Chief Rex Brown. Brown said the bullet hit her in the head.

A 7-year-old boy in Tennessee shot and killed himself with his grandfather’s pistol: 

Hills’ grandfather, Dana Buck, said he was in the living room watching TV when he heard a shot. He ran to the bedroom and found Hills, who had accidentally shot himself with a pistol.

A 3-year-old boy in Chicago, IL was critically injured after finding his father’s handgun and accidentally shooting himself in the head:

Police said the boy was in a closet with at least one other child and playing with the gun when it discharged, hitting the boy in the head and leaving him in critical condition. Police said the boy’s father took the gun, the remaining rounds and fled the scene. 

In Tennessee, a 10-year-old boy shot himself in the foot while hunting:

According to TWRA, the 10-year-old was dove hunting at the Buffalo Springs Wildlife Management Area in Grainger County when he accidentally shot himself in the foot. He was taken by medical helicopter to UT Medical Center with non-life threatening injuries.

A 3-year-old boy accidentally shot himself in the face in Atlanta: 

The 3-year-old was taken to a local hospital for treatment, according to police. The newspaper spoke with a neighbor, Ivey McMullen, who said she “heard people screaming that ‘the baby shot himself.’”

A 7-year-old boy in Ohio shot himself while playing in his grandparents’ backyard: 

Police said the boy was in his back yard on Impala Dr. with his brother. They found a gun, and began playing with it … Colerain police said that the boys live with their grandparents, and there does not seem to be a lot of supervision. Officers will also look into how the boys were able to get a gun so easily.

A 15-year-old boy shot himself in the face after he found a hidden key to his parent’s gun safe while they were at work: 

[He] found a hidden key to the gun safe and was able to get to a handgun inside. The 15-year-old told police that the gun went off as he was putting it back in the gun safe … Police said the parents told them they didn’t think their children knew where the gun safe key was hidden.

So how’s our country handling this pattern of violence resulting from children handling firearms? A child can still legally own a rifle or shotgun in 30 states. 

(via starlightmango)

butbuckyknewhim:

castielcampbell:

summershadowtwin:

fuckshitasscunt:

Science fails to recognize the single most potent element of human existence 

There is no spoon

there is no scientist

image

(via the-talking-absol)

inksplattersandearlyhours:

I think one of the reasons the Harry Potter Epilogue was so poorly received was because the audience was primarily made up of the Millennial generation.

We’ve walked with Harry, Ron and Hermione, through a world that we thought was great but slowly revealed itself to be the opposite. We unpeeled the layers of corruption within the government, we saw cruelty against minorities grow in the past decades, and had media attack us and had teachers tell us that we ‘must not tell lies’. We got angry and frustrated and, like Harry, Ron and Hermione, had to think of a way to fight back. And them winning? That would have been enough to give us hope and leave us satisfied.

But instead. There was skip scene. And suddenly they were all over 30 and happy with their 2.5 children.

And the Millennials were left flailing in the dust.

Because while we recognised and empathised with everything up to that point. But seeing the Golden Trio financially stable and content and married? That was not something our generation could recognise. Because we have no idea if we’re ever going to be able to reach that stage. Not with the world we’re living in right now.

Having Harry, Ron and Hermione stare off into the distance after the battle and wonder about what the future might be would have stuck with us. Hell, have them move into a shitty flat together and try and sort out their lives would have. Have them with screaming nightmares and failed relationships and trying to get jobs in a society that’s falling apart would have. Have them still trying to fix things in that society would have. Because we known Voldemort was just a symptom of the disease of prejudice the Wizarding World.

But don’t push us off with an ‘all was well’. In a world about magic, JK Rowling finally broke our suspension of disbelief by having them all hit middle-class and middle-age contentment and expecting a fanbase of teenagers to accept it.

Also. Since when was ‘don’t worry kids, you’re going to turn out just like your parents’ ever a happy ending? Does our generation even recognise marriage and money and jobs as the fulfillment of life anymore? Does our generation even recognise the Epilogue’s Golden Trio anymore?

(via lsunnyc)

ianoshea:

getinthefuckingjaeger:

nostopdasgay:

catslock:

condelimoncio:

 MY WHOLE LIFE IS A LIE

THAT’S CHEATING

This is a blatant violation of trust

YOU LYING FUCKS I SPENT MY WHOLE LIFE ADMIRING THE BRICK LAYERS THAT ALWAYS LAY THE BRICKS NEAT AND PERFECTLY LINED UP HOLY SHIT I LOOK UP TO YOU HOW COULD YOU

I FEEL LIKE SOMEONE JUST TOLD ME SANTA CLAUSE ISNT REAL ALL OVER AGAIN

(via inu-demon)

pbzeppelin3:

virtualbutts:

virtualbutts:


Icelandic police shot dead a man who refused to stop firing at them with a shotgun in the capital of Reykjavik earlier today — and then they apologized. It was the first time that anyone in the country was killed by police gunfire.
"The police regret this incident and wishes to extend its condolences to the man’s family," said national police chief Haraldur Johannessen.
Details of the event have yet to emerge, but this much is clear: Iceland is a weird place. The population of the island is 325,000, while the number of registered firearms is 90,000, which when you consider that Iceland also has children, suggests that more than a third of the population is armed. So why don’t Iceland’s police have to shoot people?
St. Louis happens to have about the same population as Iceland. Last year, the city’s police chief ordered a study of incidents in which officers shot at suspects. As reported by the St. Louis Post Dispatch, that happened 98 times in the 2008-2011 period, and 12 of the people shot at died.
I don’t think you can say the difference is because a lot of Iceland is rural — all but about 25,000 of the population are urban dwellers. And the National Rifle Association will be pleased to hear that it can’t all be accounted for by gun ownership: True, the U.S. has almost 90 guns per 100 people, compared with 30 per 100 in Iceland, but if gun ownership were the key difference you would expect a much narrower differential in police shootings.
One factor may be that only SWAT teams of the kind called in for in today’s shooting are allowed to carry guns; the rest of the police don’t. So the average officer — let alone a neighborhood watch character such as Florida’s George Zimmerman — can’t shoot anyone because they aren’t armed. And one reason they don’t need to be armed is that the homicide rate in Iceland is so low — on average, fewer than 0.3 per 100,000 of population, compared with 5 per 100,000 in the U.S. In 2009, according to the Global Study on Homicide, just one person was murdered in Iceland.
In an article for the BBC, Andrew Clark, a law student from Suffolk University Law School in Boston, described his decision to write his thesis on Iceland’s low violent crime rate after visiting the country’s capital in 2012. He found that Icelanders happily pick up strangers in their cars and leave their babies unattended in the street. To a Londoner, New Yorker or Bostonian, that’s unheard of. He concluded that the biggest reason for Iceland’s low violent-crime rate was social equality. Rich and poor go to the same schools, while 1.1 percent say they are upper class, 1.5 percent lower class — and the rest in between. So there’s less resentment and anger.
Another point might be that although there are a lot of guns in Iceland (Icelanders like to hunt), buying one requires stringent checks, including a medical exam and a written test. That may prevent people from buying and using guns in a fit of anger. It might also explain why very few of Iceland’s very few homicides involve firearms.
There are other possible factors, of course. For example, Icelanders have very low rates of drug abuse. It isn’t clear why, but as soon as there was a sniff of a problem in 1973, the government established special police units and courts to tackle it. I’m guessing they had very little else to do.(x)

This country is just fucking lovely
Sidenote: The police once literally found a thief by following footprints in the snow
also, did he call us weird bc someone apologized for killing another human being???

This is somewhat relevant again

moving to Iceland ASAP

pbzeppelin3:

virtualbutts:

virtualbutts:

Icelandic police shot dead a man who refused to stop firing at them with a shotgun in the capital of Reykjavik earlier today — and then they apologized. It was the first time that anyone in the country was killed by police gunfire.

"The police regret this incident and wishes to extend its condolences to the man’s family," said national police chief Haraldur Johannessen.

Details of the event have yet to emerge, but this much is clear: Iceland is a weird place. The population of the island is 325,000, while the number of registered firearms is 90,000, which when you consider that Iceland also has children, suggests that more than a third of the population is armed. So why don’t Iceland’s police have to shoot people?

St. Louis happens to have about the same population as Iceland. Last year, the city’s police chief ordered a study of incidents in which officers shot at suspects. As reported by the St. Louis Post Dispatch, that happened 98 times in the 2008-2011 period, and 12 of the people shot at died.

I don’t think you can say the difference is because a lot of Iceland is rural — all but about 25,000 of the population are urban dwellers. And the National Rifle Association will be pleased to hear that it can’t all be accounted for by gun ownership: True, the U.S. has almost 90 guns per 100 people, compared with 30 per 100 in Iceland, but if gun ownership were the key difference you would expect a much narrower differential in police shootings.

One factor may be that only SWAT teams of the kind called in for in today’s shooting are allowed to carry guns; the rest of the police don’t. So the average officer — let alone a neighborhood watch character such as Florida’s George Zimmerman — can’t shoot anyone because they aren’t armed. And one reason they don’t need to be armed is that the homicide rate in Iceland is so low — on average, fewer than 0.3 per 100,000 of population, compared with 5 per 100,000 in the U.S. In 2009, according to the Global Study on Homicide, just one person was murdered in Iceland.

In an article for the BBC, Andrew Clark, a law student from Suffolk University Law School in Boston, described his decision to write his thesis on Iceland’s low violent crime rate after visiting the country’s capital in 2012. He found that Icelanders happily pick up strangers in their cars and leave their babies unattended in the street. To a Londoner, New Yorker or Bostonian, that’s unheard of. He concluded that the biggest reason for Iceland’s low violent-crime rate was social equality. Rich and poor go to the same schools, while 1.1 percent say they are upper class, 1.5 percent lower class — and the rest in between. So there’s less resentment and anger.

Another point might be that although there are a lot of guns in Iceland (Icelanders like to hunt), buying one requires stringent checks, including a medical exam and a written test. That may prevent people from buying and using guns in a fit of anger. It might also explain why very few of Iceland’s very few homicides involve firearms.

There are other possible factors, of course. For example, Icelanders have very low rates of drug abuse. It isn’t clear why, but as soon as there was a sniff of a problem in 1973, the government established special police units and courts to tackle it. I’m guessing they had very little else to do.
(x)

This country is just fucking lovely

Sidenote: The police once literally found a thief by following footprints in the snow

also, did he call us weird bc someone apologized for killing another human being???

This is somewhat relevant again

moving to Iceland ASAP

(via floranna2)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Ever heard of the game Portal?
sw087 sw087 Said:

anthill-inside:

+++ The Dwarf Bread Is A Lie +++